XF Dive Pool and Rules Updated

On January 4th, 2015 AXIS Flight School created an experimental dive pool for what was then referred to as XRW (Extreme Relative Work). This is a still developing discipline where canopy and wing-suit pilots build formations. In essence, an XRW skydive is a dissimilar formation flight.

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Photo courtesy of Dan Dupuis.

The first dive pool developed by AXIS was called XF. The name change from XRW was proposed similar to how RW (Relative Work) was changed to FS (Formation Skydiving); and since CF (Canopy Formation) is already taken, the XF abbreviation was introduced for “Cross” Formation. The first draft only had 3 Randoms and 6 blocks.

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Dive pool images from 2015

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Since wing-suit technology has dramatically increased flight performance over the past few years, new formations have become possible. The updated 2020 version now features 8 randoms and 10 blocks dispersed over three classes: intermediate, advanced, and open. In addition, the XF rules have been updated to evolve with the times and practitioners can even make use of the AXIS DrawGenerator. There are now two orientations for the wing suit pilot to fly in:

  • Normal (belly to earth) – indicated in gray, and
  • Inverted (back to earth) – indicated in red.

Back in the day 🙂

AXIS coach Niklas Daniel started experimenting with XF back in April 2010, and has posted videos and written articles about the subject.

2010 – Nik’s first few attempts at Skydive Elsinore.

2011 – Training Camp at Skydive Arizona

2011 – MOAB Boogie.

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Photo by Taya Weiss.

2014 – Getting a bit braver. Post by Blue Skies Magazine.

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2015 – XF gets some exposure on Discovery Canada with first 3-way Night Formation.

Continued fun, experimentation, and introducing the discipline to others.

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Wing-suit pilot and photo by Alex Swindle.

Choppin’ with style

Another cutaway photo by Mark Kirschenbaum; this time as the featured photo in Blue Skies Magazine! i82: Oct 2016

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Using a tertiary system, Niklas Daniel performs an intentional cutaway over Skydive Arizona. Photo by Trunk / Hypoxic

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Cutaway!

I would like to thank Mark ‘Trunk’ Kirschenbaum of Hypoxic for accompanying me on some fun jumps over Skydive Arizona. A couple of weeks ago, Trunk captured some great footage of some intentional cutaways, which AXIS Flight School intends to enter in a film festival contest later this year.
Congratulations Trunk, on snagging the October 2016  Parachutist Centerfold spot! 
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Using a tertiary canopy system, Niklas Daniel performs an intentional cutaway at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photo by MARK KIRSCHENBAUM.
About Parachutist: “When PCA (USPA’s predecessor) first published the magazine in 1957, it was not much more than a newsletter, but it did serve the very important purpose of keeping the organization’s members informed about news in the sport. In the mid-1960s, the magazine first began printing its cover in color, foreshadowing the glossy magazine you see today. Through the 1970s and ’80s, Parachutist’s circulation continued to grow as membership and advertising revenues increased. The magazine began to showcase stunning color photography inside and out. It not only kept members up-to-date on industry news, it served as a forum for opinion, disseminated safety information, covered the sport’s history, offered general-interest skydiving articles and listed events, drop zones and membership data for reference purposes. With the rise of internet communications in the 1990s and through the 2000s, Parachutist shifted its focus from news and reference to concentrate more on education, entertainment and safety features. That change in focus and the advent of technology is what you see today with this website. This is our effort to expand the reach that Parachutist has as both a safety and instructional tool.”

Skydiving with a Bowling Ball | Outrageous Acts of Science

Published on May 14, 2014

A bowling ball has never looked so light and free-falling as it does bouncing from person to person in midair after being launched from a moving airplane. | For more Outrageous Acts of Science, visit http://science.discovery.com/tv-shows…

Catch Outrageous Acts of Science Saturdays at 10/9c on Science!

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Check out SCI2 for infinitely awesome science videos. Every day. | http://bit.ly/SCI2YT

vex 13 000 – skydive art

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Combining elements of skydiving and art into one project revolving around time and the transformation of self: continuously moving beyond the cycle of fear, letting go of inhibitions, and falling into the unknown vision.
Limited edition screen prints available for purchase at http://www.vexedart.com/store.html
Find out more at http://www.vexedart.com.html
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/wwwvex…
Google+ https://plus.google.com/+Vexedart/posts

OEW Canopy Choice

 Originally posted on the Performance Designs Blog.

Joe Grabianowski in Freefall

Operation Enduring Warrior – Skydive is a non-profit organization that works to empower wounded veterans by helping them to achieve Extreme Goals. Operation Enduring Warrior has seen a number of inspiring veterans welcomed into our sport and skydiving family. Most of us have seen the inspiring images of Todd Love and other wounded warriors that have gone through AFF training and continued to become licensed skydivers. Axis Flight School has been a big part of this training, and has helped these wounded warriors to fulfill their personal goals of becoming licensed skydivers. We sat down with lead FS coach for Axis, Brianne Thompson, to better understand the challenge of choosing the appropriate canopy for these new skydivers.

“As with all things, there is a learning process. We take our best educated guess, try it, then assess the next best course of action. In some cases, you wing it. In the case of the Spectre 170, when it was first sent to us for Todd Love, I was a little bit concerned that it would be too small. I was expecting a Navigator 200. I tend to be on the conservative side of things, and putting a student, regardless of their size or body shape, on something below a 200 seemed a bit out there. Granted, it was a complete emotional response; I had no scientific evidence of that being bad, just that “we’d never done that before”. Dangerous words, to be sure. So, when the Spectre 170 came I was a bit skeptical, but Nik felt confident that it would be awesome. He did a test jump and we agreed that shorter brake line length would be critical in order to preserve the arms and hands of Todd. We needed the canopy to flare at or above his belly button, rather than past his hips. Once the brake lines were shortened, we were ready to go. Todd did his first couple landings with the confidence of someone who had done that before, and as someone constantly trying to learn their canopy. It was actually pretty exciting to watch.

Spread in Parachutist

The landings were soft and forgiving, but the power of the Spectre had yet to reveal itself. After several jumps, Nik figured it would be time to follow Todd under canopy in order to get some pics. Nik jumped the Pulse 190, thinking that that had more glide and size than the Storm and he would be all set. What was amazing was that because of Todd’s lack of legs, it affected how he hung in the harness and it directly affected the glide of the canopy.

Todd Love on Spectre 170

Todd sat in the harness much like a paraglider pilot: he reclined in the harness. With the combination of the recline, and the lack of drag on his legs, the Spectre had more glide than the Pulse! A surprising amount more.

The Spectre’s powerful, yet forgivable flare was the other big keeper. The Spectre allowed the students to correct mid-flare, rather than having to commit to the process and hope for the best. We all want soft landings for our students, but we must confess, it seemed even more critical for these students because Todd and Joe had no landing gear. Their landing gear is their seat/tailbone and spine. The Spectre offers a flare that allows the student to adjust and correct, mid-flare, with good response from the canopy, yet without an adverse affect. As the students grow and evolve, it will be important for them to try other canopies. Their canopy skills will evolve just like their freefall skills, and it will be important for us to foster those changes. But, during the learning process, the Spectre seems to be the most forgiving canopy for the wing loading and body style that these students have.”

Contact:

Brianne Thompson
AXIS Flight School
4900 N. Taylor St.
Eloy, AZ 85131 USA
520-466-4200
Info@AXISFlightSchool.com
AXISFlightSchool.com

Photos by Mike McGowan